New Study Says Octopus Eggs Came to Earth on a Comet From Space

Thursday, 17 May 2018 - 11:36AM
Space
Thursday, 17 May 2018 - 11:36AM
New Study Says Octopus Eggs Came to Earth on a Comet From Space
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Image credit: YouTube

Have you looked at octopi and other cephalopods recently? Like really looked at them? Words haven't been invented yet to accurately describe spineless creatures with bulging eyes, suction cups on their many limbs, and the ability to expel clouds of ink like ninjas to escape danger. There is one explanation from an international group of scientists that may shed some light on why these oddballs exist on our planet: aliens.


A new article published in the journal Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology by a group of 33 scientists suggests that octopi are the result of panspermia, a concept that suggests that organisms, bacteria, and virus from space can and have hitched rides on comets. 

 

When those space rocks hit Earth, the bacteria survives, grows, and evolves. The authors of the paper say that in the case of cephalopods, it may not have been bacteria, but "cryopreserved and matrix protected" eggs.



"The possibility that cryopreserved Squid and/or Octopus eggs, arrived in icy bolides several hundred million years ago should not be discounted," the scientists wrote, "as that would be a parsimonious cosmic explanation for the Octopus' sudden emergence on Earth ca. 270 million years ago."



To be clear, the article does not present new evidence, nor does it aim to prove that octopi absolutely came from space eggs.

 

"This review article is intended to represent, in the main, the collective knowledge and wisdom of over 30 scientists and scholars across many disciplines of the Physical and Biological sciences," the authors wrote. "Our aim here is to facilitate further discussion in the biophysical, biomedical and evolutionary science communities to the quite different H-W 'Cosmic' origins viewpoint which better handles, in our opinion, a wider range of physical, astrophysical, biological and biophysical facts often quite inexplicable, if not contradictory, under the dominant Terrestrial neo-Darwinian paradigm."



There are some who reject the notion completely, and others who are at the very least skeptical of panspermia.

 

It's an interesting idea that I hope is supported by hard evidence in the future, because believing that this planet could produce something as off-putting as an octopus worries me.


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