New Giant Geoglyphs Found Near the Ancient 'Nazca Lines' Raise Fresh Questions About Aliens

Monday, 04 June 2018 - 11:26AM
Earth
Monday, 04 June 2018 - 11:26AM
New Giant Geoglyphs Found Near the Ancient 'Nazca Lines' Raise Fresh Questions About Aliens
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Image credit: YouTube

Since their first discovery 80 eighty years ago, the Nazca Lines have fascinated people from around the world, sparking speculation over whether their creators (the ancient Nazca people of Peru) carved out the giant designs for irrigation, signaling aliens, or as offerings to the gods.

 

What's strange about the Lines is that a lot of the designs aren't visible from the ground, only the air, which prompts the question of who was meant to see them.

 

Ufologists say aliens. Some archaeologists say the gods. Either way, it's even more impressive that we're still finding more of them scattered around Peru—25 more designs were recently discovered, according to Peru's Culture Ministry.



The previously identified Nazca Lines consist of roughly 800 straight lines (which stretch up to 30 miles), 300 geometric shapes (which include triangles, rectangles, spirals, and arrows), and around 80 animal and plant designs, including a spider, a cactus, and one dubbed "The Astronaut," which looks like a human figure wearing a space helmet.

 

The new designs include glyphs of a killer whale and dancing women and are estimated to be around 2,000 years old. 

 

These new designs (which are called "geoglyphs" by archaeologists) are much older than those created by the Nazca people, however—the Nazca Lines were created between 200 and 700 AD, but these were probably created by the Paracas people around two millennia ago.



The new geoglyphs are apparently part of the Palpa Lines, a group of figures that were carved onto hillsides in the Palpa province, and were spotted by drone flyovers.

 

According to Johny Isla, one of the lead archaeologists involved in the discovery, drones "have allowed us to broaden our documentation and discover new groups of figures."

 

Isla estimates that there was a period of roughly 1,200 years in which various Peruvian cultures created these images, some of which may still lie undiscovered.

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