Watch this Former NASA Engineer Wreck His Backyard With the World's Largest Super Soaker

Friday, 20 July 2018 - 9:53AM
Technology
Friday, 20 July 2018 - 9:53AM
Watch this Former NASA Engineer Wreck His Backyard With the World's Largest Super Soaker
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Cover Image: Screenshot/Mark Rober/YouTube (link in article)

If you're a kid of the 1980s – '90s, then there are two words that can perfectly summarize the fun you had during the summers of your youth: Super Soaker. Invented in the early '80s by an African-American NASA engineer named Lonnie Johnson and first sold in 1990, the Larami Super Soaker is one of the most iconic toys of all time and still a necessary part of any good childhood. Continuing the tradition (and following up his massive Nerf gun build), former NASA engineer Mark Rober decided to make some alterations to the toy's design by increasing the scale and adding in nitrogen gas. The result is a Guinness World Record holding Super Soaker that is 7 feet long and can blast a target with a jetstream that is 2,400 PSI and 243 MPH!

In other words, you probably don't want to get hit in the face with it.

In a YouTube video showing off his engineering feat, Rober discusses the process of designing and fabricating the pressurized water cannon, chats with the original designer, and of course tests his very powerful mega toy against panes of glass, fruit, cans of soda, and other objects that he presumably had lying around the house. Spoiler alert: the deluxe super soaker rips through just about everything it comes in contact with, slicing through watermelon like it was paper, obliterating a line of eggs like a firing squad, and giving Rober a lot of glass to sweep up. For context, Rober says that the original Super Soaker was only pressurized at 40 PSI and the hose on a fire truck is around 300 PSI. So clearly the next logical step would be to mass produce these machines and give them to firefighters, right?

For all the budding engineers out there who want to cause their own light destruction, Rober made the CAD files for the project available online, but he warns that this is not a toy. "It's definitely something you don't want to stick your hand in front of," he told CNN, adding in the description of the video that 2,400 PSI is "basically a bomb. We took a lot of precautions not shown here so only attempt this if you know what you're doing. I don't want to have to attend your funeral because I don't like to travel."





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