The United States Suspects That A Strange Russian Space Object Is Actually A Secret Weapon

Wednesday, 15 August 2018 - 11:03AM
Technology
Military Tech
Wednesday, 15 August 2018 - 11:03AM
The United States Suspects That A Strange Russian Space Object Is Actually A Secret Weapon
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Pixabay Composite

The Space Force doesn't officially exist yet, but they may already have their hands full dealing with Russia. Reuters reports that during the U.N.'s Conference on Disarmament yesterday, Yleem D.S. Poblete (the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance) called Russia's efforts to develop counterspace technology "disturbing given the recent pattern of Russian malign behavior," perhaps a diplomatically oblique reference to their interference in the last American presidential election, their ongoing disinformation and provokatsiya campaigns throughout the United States and Europe, or even the murder of a British civilian through the use of the nerve agent Novichok. Poblete added that a proposed treaty by the nation would not stop it from stockpiling new weapons that can target foreign satellites, and that for all we know they may have already launched one into orbit.

Russia's belligerence is well-documented. In an announcement made earlier this year, Russia's Federation Council Defense and Security Committee Viktor Bondarev was blasé, plainly stating that "all future wars will be fought not only in the air, but also in space" and that "it is clear that resisting the means of modern warfare with just rifles and machine guns will be practically impossible." 

Representatives for Russia said earlier this year that preventing an arms race was a top priority, but the following month Vladimir Putin unveiled plans that seemed to contradict those statements. Among the six new weapons announced was a mobile combat laser system that is allegedly capable of knocking out satellite communication. "To the United States this is yet further proof that the Russian actions do not match their words," Poblete said at the conference. According to The Washington Times, Poblete also referenced the launch of what Russia called a "space apparatus inspector" last October, stating that object was unlike anything seen before and that it has displayed some "very abnormal behavior" that has the United States concerned.

Opening quote
Now, I can tell you that our Russian colleagues will deny that its systems are meant to be hostile. The Russian Ministry of Defense has put out a press release stating these are simply inspector satellites... So the question before this body is: How do we verify what countries say their spacecraft are doing? What would be enough information to prove what the purpose of an object is?
Closing quote

Russian delegate Alexander Deyneko responded to Poblete's statements as expected, calling them "the same unfounded, slanderous accusations based on suspicions, on suppositions and so on." He argued that since the US has concerns about Russian activity, the country should be working with Russia on the proposed treaty instead of alleging foul play. "They should be active in working to develop a treaty that would 100 percent satisfy the security interests of the American people," Deyneko said, "but they have not made this constructive contribution." China is on board with the treaty as it stands, but the United States is pushing for a stricter version that would ensure that nations like Russia that seem to be focusing heavily on space weapons are better kept in check.


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