Teaching Math to Kids Using the Microsoft HoloLens

Tuesday, 28 August 2018 - 9:49AM
Virtual Reality
Gadgets
Tuesday, 28 August 2018 - 9:49AM
Teaching Math to Kids Using the Microsoft HoloLens
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Image Credit: Unsplash Composite
There are some people who are genuinely fascinated by numbers and geometric shapes, but most will agree that math is not high on the list of universally loved subjects in school. Like most things, the trick is to find a way to make learning math more fun and interactive, and one teacher in New Zealand seems to have found the perfect solution: the Microsoft HoloLens.

Since its introduction in 2016, the mixed reality that the HoloLens provides has been used in some interesting ways: from subbing in virtual anatomy models for cadavers at medical schools, to providing augmented reality tours of Mars, to even allowing Trekkies to play "The Game" from Star Trek: Next Generation, Microsoft's device has proven to be remarkably adaptable and versatile. When Ormiston Senior College educator Subash Chandar K was first introduced to the technology, he thought of the wide range of possibilities for its use in a classroom setting. When he was offered a few sets for his students, he jumped at the opportunity. "I wanted them to be exposed to this type of technology," Subash said. "This is something that we see where the future is heading towards." With the headsets, students were able to see three-dimensional holograms of objects floating in front of them and could reach out and touch them to gain more information or to view them from different perspectives. "Where students used to be sitting in a classroom and having people talk at them, now students can actually have a game-ified experience so they can learn maths in a very fun way," said Husain Al-Badry of DATACOM, the company that made it possible for Subash and his students to use the tech.

if the HoloLens can be used for math, then there is no limit to what developers can do with it in the realm of education. Literature classes could be enhanced by allowing students to sit in the Globe Theater for one of William Shakespeare's plays. Physics courses could have Bill Nye appear in a lab coat and bow tie in the middle of an actual laboratory. We can't wait to see how Microsoft and other companies dabbling in AR and mixed reality completely change what it means to go to school in the next ten to twenty years.

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