The Eagle Has Landed: NASA Releases 19,000 Hours of Behind-the-Scenes Moon Landing Recordings

Wednesday, 29 August 2018 - 11:58AM
Moon
Wednesday, 29 August 2018 - 11:58AM
The Eagle Has Landed: NASA Releases 19,000 Hours of Behind-the-Scenes Moon Landing Recordings
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Image Credit: Pixabay
If the moon landing really was faked by NASA and Stanley Kubrick, then it must have been the most thorough faking in the history of fakes! According to The Boston Globe, NASA has released over 19,000 hours of flight controller audio recordings from Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin's 1969 Apollo 11 mission. The audio was digitized from 170 tapes (each with 30 channels) in collaboration with the University of Texas at Dallas, and are now available to the public for free on the internet.

Over the past five decades, we have all heard the recordings of Aldrin and Armstrong speaking to Mission Control in Houston about taking the first steps on the surface of the moon. Back in July, NASA released more audio recordings of the astronauts during the trip but the recordings shared by NASA were different. If you've ever seen a behind-the-scenes look at any large production or event, you'll know that there are lots of people working on various facets of the mission to make sure everything goes well. For the Apollo 11 mission, there was a special intercom system that flight controllers used to communicate with various other teams during the 8-day, 3-hour mission–teams without whom the landmark event would not have been possible.

"We're approaching the 50th anniversary of Apollo, and I'm really pleased that this resource is becoming available," said NASA's Johnson Space Center director Mark Geyer in a statement this past July. "Experience is one of the best teachers, so as we continue our work to expand human exploration of our solar system, go back to the Moon and on to Mars, we stand on the shoulders of the giants who made Apollo happen. These tapes offer a unique glimpse into what it takes to make history and what it will take to make the future."

The recordings themselves are not that exciting unless you're really into small talk, acronyms, and directives, but they are an important part of history. As John H.L. Hansen explains, the effort to get the old tapes digitized was "to contribute to recognizing the countless scientists, engineers, and specialists who worked behind the scenes of the Apollo program to make this a success." The recordings are accompanied by computer printouts that show timestamps and information about when they were recorded and which channel they are from. There is a lot of dead air between communications, but if you have 19,000 hours to spare, you can find them over on the Internet Archive.



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NASA
Moon