This NASA Astronaut Shot a Full-Length Music Video Aboard the International Space Station

Wednesday, 03 October 2018 - 12:41PM
Space
Wednesday, 03 October 2018 - 12:41PM
This NASA Astronaut Shot a Full-Length Music Video Aboard the International Space Station
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Image Credit: Screenshot NASA/YouTube
The work that astronauts do while orbiting Earth aboard the International Space Station is important and not exactly easy, but there is fair amount of downtime that comes with the job. While most of us get to leave work for breaks or after clocking out, astronauts like Drew Feustel live, work, and play in the same spaces every single day. NASA recently shared a video to its YouTube channel that shows Feustel enjoying some quality "me time:" singing, playing guitar, and filming a music video in space that would cost an Earth-based performer a lot of money or CGI to recreate.

According to CNET, Feustel is scheduled to head home this week, so the music video is his goodbye to the ISS and to space. While floating through passageways and strumming his guitar, Feustel sings a song by his friend Gord Sinclair, the bassist for Canadian rock band The Tragically Hip. Naturally, there are several cosmic and natural references to stars, oceans, skies, and the world around us in the song. It feels like it was written specifically for this video to exist, as stunning images of space complement Sinclair's lyrics. 

"Special thanks to the crew of Expedition 55 and 56 for their support and participation in our human space exploration mission," Feustel wrote on Twitter. "I am ever thankful for the support of my family, friends, and colleagues… love is all around us and we are all around the world."



Feustel's video is cool, but it's not the first time someone has shot an out-of-this-world music video. Back in 2012, Chris Hadfield recorded and released "Space Oddity," a cover of David Bowie's 1969 single of the same name. Also shot aboard ISS, the video featured Hadfield (and a guitar) floating more dramatically through the space and staring wondrously out of space station windows at Earth. It has been viewed nearly 42 million times, but for those who haven't had the opportunity, we've included it below. It is an absolute gem.

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