Collection of Lunar Rocks Called "The Moon Puzzle" Expected to Fetch $500,000 At Auction

Thursday, 11 October 2018 - 11:57AM
Space
Moon
Thursday, 11 October 2018 - 11:57AM
Collection of Lunar Rocks Called "The Moon Puzzle" Expected to Fetch $500,000 At Auction
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Screenshot: Radio.com/YouTube from images by RR Auction
If you're not rich enough to buy a trip around the Moon with SpaceX (like Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa), the next best thing is bringing a piece of the Moon to you, right? Well, if you have some extra cash kicking around, you can buy "The Moon Puzzle," a collection of lunar rocks that fell to the Sahara Desert as meteorites. It's expected to fetch upwards of $500,000 which, believe it or not, is less than what Han Solo's Star Wars jacket was priced at this past September. It's a bargain!

The rocks are called "The Moon Puzzle" because the six fragments fit together to form a single, lumpy piece, sort of like a jigsaw puzzle. The largest piece weighs about six pounds, and the combined Puzzle weighs about 12 pounds total. According to Geoff Notkin, the chief executive of Aerolite Meteorites, "'Few, if any, of the world's top museums have a lunar meteorite that is anywhere near this in size and uniqueness. Without a doubt, this is one of the most important meteorites available for acquisition anywhere in the world today. It is perhaps the most significant example of our nearest celestial neighbour ever offered for sale in the history of meteorite science."



Despite the incredible condition and rarity of this meteorite, no one has figured out how old it is yet, though it has been confirmed to be a collection of genuine moon rocks (the technical term is "lunar feldspathic breccia"). The rocks will be sold on October 18th by RR Auctions, which has sold everything from Tony Soprano's Cadillac Escalade from The Sopranos ($120,000) to a signed Harry Potter book by JK Rowling ($14,000).

Meteorites can fetch some high prices, depending on their size and composition, but rocks from the Moon take the cake. For comparison, a 22-pound meteorite found in Michigan is expected to sell for around $100,000. Of course, its value may have depreciated due to its 30-year history of being used as a doorstop.
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