Who Wants To Live Forever? A New Video Explores What Humans Look Like In A Future 1,000 Years From Today

Monday, 29 October 2018 - 1:02PM
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Monday, 29 October 2018 - 1:02PM
Who Wants To Live Forever? A New Video Explores What Humans Look Like In A Future 1,000 Years From Today
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In 1926, Lee DeForest (the inventor of the vacuum tube) claimed that landing a person on the Moon and bringing them back alive would "never occur regardless of all future advances."

In 1977, entrepreneur and tech innovator Ken Olsen famously said: "There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home."

Now, 40 years later, everyone has a computer in their pocket that's several million times more powerful than all the computers NASA used to guide the 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing.

What are the next seemingly impossible scientific advancements humans will make in the next millennium? A YouTube video by AsapSCIENCE has some predictions.



1. Nanomachines Will Trigger the Rise of Transhumanism (And More)

Apart from "the singularity," the phrase "transhumanism" is probably one of the more common sci-fi buzzwords floating around tech circles. The idea is that humans will eventually augment their bodies and minds with so much technology that we will blur the line between human and something entirely new. For example, if the human experience used to be defined by having our thoughts locked up in our skulls, what happens when humans can communicate telepathically via neural implants? 

AsapSCIENCE predicts that the main catalyst for transhumanism will be nanomachines, which will boost our immune system, fight off cancer, and even perform micro-surgeries on our body. Futurist Ray Kurzweil has already claimed that nanotechnology will make us basically immortal by the year 2040, and the rise of undying techno-people would certainly represent a departure from the regular course of human evolution.

2. Mutations

But let's talk about evolution. The video points out that at least one person has developed the ability to digest almost anything, even toxic materials, and that this mutation demonstrates how quickly humanity can start to display new, potentially beneficial traits (although from an evolutionary perspective, "quickly" still means tens of thousands of years). An alternative to natural evolution, the video suggests, might be the creation of designer babies, whose genes have been edited before birth to produce children with desirable traits.

Incidentally, this exact scenario was what Stephen Hawking was worried about when he claimed that humanity is at risk of being dominated by a race of genetic superhumans.

3. Digital Consciousness

Finally, the video suggests that humanity may abandon our biological bodies altogether and upload our consciousness to computers, which will potentially allow us to copy ourselves and spread across the universe. Interestingly, Isaac Asimov's famous short story "The Last Question" explores what humanity's ultimate future may look like if this came to pass.
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