Scientists May Have Created the Basis for a More Complex Quantum Computer

Monday, 05 November 2018 - 12:54PM
Technology
Physics
Monday, 05 November 2018 - 12:54PM
Scientists May Have Created the Basis for a More Complex Quantum Computer
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Composite from Pixabay
Noted quantum physicist Anton Zeilinger was recently quoted as saying "I'm personally of the opinion that in the future, most-if not all-communications will be quantum." China has already taken steps to making a quantum internet a reality, and so has the United States. Unfortunately, quantum computing has been lagging behind, with various tech giants (including IBM and Google) struggling to add more and more qubits to their machines. A new study, however, has found that the key to creating more powerful quantum computers may not be adding more qubits—it may be fashioning more complex qubits.

Qubits are like normal computer bits, but with an additional possible state that's both 0 and 1 at the same time. Because most quantum computers are assembled from 50-75 qubits max, the information capacity of the whole system is pretty low. In addition, these qubits are only entangled in two dimensions, which further limits the amount of information they can handle. Research from University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences decided to experiment with new ways to arrange and entangle qubits, and discovered that it was possible to entangle three particles in three dimensions. After some difficulties with devising the experiment, the team was able to accomplish their goal.

"The special thing about our experiment is that for the first time, it entangles three photons beyond the conventional two-dimensional nature," says Manuel Erhard, one of the authors of the study. What comes next may change not only the face of quantum computing, but quantum telecommunication. According to Anton Zeilinger himself, who was an author on the study, "I think the methods and technologies that we developed in this publication allow us to teleport a higher proportion of the total quantum information of a single photon, which could be important for quantum communication networks."

If you're not familiar with quantum teleportation, check out our article on it here.
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