VR Company Develops Tools to Teach Military Language Skills in 'Video Game' With Human Instructors

Friday, 03 May 2019 - 2:08PM
Military Tech
Science News
Friday, 03 May 2019 - 2:08PM
VR Company Develops Tools to Teach Military Language Skills in 'Video Game' With Human Instructors
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Jedburgh Technology has developed virtual reality training for the American military that synthesizes kinesthetic learning experiences with immersive linguistics. Drawing on research and development from the tech sector, U.S. Special Operations Forces, and the intelligence community, Jedburgh integrates multisensory input into linguistics and cultural training to accelerate learning and retention for when the stakes are highest. 


It's one part video game, three parts research. The pillars backing Jedburgh's technology are kinesthetic learning, realistic environments, and task-based learning.


Kinesthetic learning draws upon the mind-body connection to encode language with corresponding actions. This is so deep-seated within us that simply using a given word will activate the corresponding sensorimotor areas of our brain associated with that action. Realistic environments and task-based learning require trainees to accomplish familiar goals – making a purchase, visiting a doctor – in a dynamic environment and experience lifelike conditions where their skills could be tested before entering the arena where the consequences of failure are greatest – the field.


Apart from advanced neurological learning systems, Jedburgh offers cutting-edge technology that is simple to execute. Utilizing nothing more complex than the HTC Vive, Jedburgh crafted detailed virtual environments ranging from ordinary supermarkets to engagement with key leaders. Two-way audio allows for live training across time zones, and machine learning analyzes trainee performance over time.


The potential for this technology extends far into the future. For example: simulating combat experiences in an immersive virtual environment might provide a kind of early exposure therapy for soldiers before they arrive on the battlefield. This, in turn, might feasibly reduce the stress response to actual combat, allowing for clearer decision-making unclouded by the chemical cumulonimbus of fight-or-flight hormones – the kind of decision-making that is critical to victories.


Watch two military linguists take this technology for a test drive:

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