U.S. Army Investigating Military Applications of 'Exotic Materials' Alleged to be from Alien Spacecraft

Tuesday, 22 October 2019 - 10:17AM
Military Tech
Alien Life
Tuesday, 22 October 2019 - 10:17AM
U.S. Army Investigating Military Applications of 'Exotic Materials' Alleged to be from Alien Spacecraft
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The newly-formed U.S. Army Futures Command, created last year to support the "continuous transformation of Army modernization in order to provide future warfighters with the concepts, capabilities and organizational structures they need to dominate a future battlefield" is living up to its name, undertaking an intriguing partnership with Tom DeLonge's To The Stars Academy (TTSA) to test 'exotic' metals acquired by TTSA earlier this year. The contract, reported by Bloomberg and originally published on the Black Vault, names Luis Elizondo, a former Pentagon official who claims he was involved with the Defense Intelligence Agency's (DIA) Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program AATIP, as a principal investigator for TTSA.


TTSA is best known for its release of headline-grabbing videos purporting to show Navy fighter jets encountering unidentified aircraft and the various claims made by Elizondo about the AATIP. In a 2017 statement to CNN, Elizondo suggested these unidentified aircraft may have had extraterrestrial origins. "These aircraft — we'll call them aircraft — are displaying characteristics that are not currently within the US inventory nor in any foreign inventory that we are aware of," Elizondo said, further calling them "things that don't have any obvious flight services, any obvious forms of propulsion, and maneuvering in ways that include extreme maneuverability beyond, I would submit, the healthy G-forces of a human or anything biological."


In a TTSA press release quoted by Vice, the metals "are reported to have come from an advanced aerospace vehicle of unknown origin" and were purchased for the princely sum of $35,000. Vice further reports that the materials are alleged by UFO researcher Linda Moulton Howe to possess some rather interesting qualities: in 2004, Howe claimed that the materials levitate when exposed to certain electromagnetic frequencies. 


While the veracity of the claim has yet to be publicly confirmed, the Army seems to be intent on finding out for itself. "The Army's interest in those materials, or really any materials, is exploring what their capability is," Army Futures Command senior researcher Joe Cannon told Bloomberg. "Any speculation as to their origin I think is immaterial, right? They have made technical claims that have interested us."


TTSA's press release on the partnership seemed uncharacteristically banal, perhaps due to security protocols in place. "This cooperative research agreement brings additional, critically important expertise that is necessary to advance the state-of-the-art in both our near and long-term technology areas of study," reads a statement from TTSA COO and Aerospace Division Director Steve Justice. "While the Army has specific military performance interests in the research, much of the work is expected to have dual-use application in support of TTSA's path to commercialization and public benefit mission."


Whether or not any findings will be made immediately made public is up to speculation, but given the government's tendency towards opacity when it comes to these matters, we don't expect to see anything about American UFO technology gracing the front page of the New York Times anytime soon.
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