This is What The Blizzard of 2015 Looks Like From Space Right Now

Monday, 26 January 2015 - 11:57AM
Space Imagery
Monday, 26 January 2015 - 11:57AM
This is What The Blizzard of 2015 Looks Like From Space Right Now

If you're on the East coast of America right now, you're probably either panic buying unhealthy snacks at your local grocery store or wondering when your boss is going to pack you off from work early. The cause of all this drama is a potentially historic winter storm which is currently taking aim just off the coast of major cities including New York City, Boston and Philadelphia. Winter Storm Juno looks set to impact a huge swathe of the Eastern seaboard as it brings blizzard conditions to around 28 million people and significant snowfall to at least another 20 million. New York City's Mayor Bill de Blasio warned residents that Juno could be one of the worst winter storms ever to hit the city, filling our heads with thoughts of that chilly looking Statue of Liberty from The Day After Tomorrow. 

 

As is always the case with storms like this, the size of the system is best gauged from the lofty perspective of NOAA's many eagle-eyed satellites. Over the last couple of days the GOES East satellite has been monitoring Juno as it grows from a deep tropical trough to today's snow-bearing behemoth.

 

Taken on January 23rd, the shot below shows the system developing over the Gulf of Mexico. As it progressed up the Eastern Seaboard, it brought some seriously heavy rainfall to the Carolinas.

(Credit: NOAA)

 

Fast forward 3 days and Juno has buddied up with cold air on the Northeast coast, giving it the ability to rain down its wrath of snowfall at a rate that is thought to peak late Monday night at around 2-4 inches per hour. By the time Juno rolls away from the Northeast, it is expected to leave Boston with around 24 inches of snow while the likes of New York City and Philadelphia should see around 16 and 8 inches respectively.

 (Credit: NOAA)

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